Computer Science


A Level

By studying A Level Computer Science at CCSS you are able to take advantage of our Cambridge location and connections, and our approach is to encourage you to experiment with collaborative solutions, discovering the variety of approaches that can be employed. Whatever your ambition in computer science, we will be able to support your targets and challenge you to go even further.

Course Overview

The course provides a general grounding in computer science along with an understanding of computer systems, the principles of programming and the solving of problems.

Unit Guide

You will study the following units on A Level Computer Science:

  • Unit 1 – Fundamentals of Programming
  • Unit 2 – Fundamentals of Data Structures
  • Unit 3 – Systematic Approach to Problem Solving
  • Unit 4 – Theory of Computation
  • Unit 5 – Fundamentals of Data Representation
  • Unit 6 – Fundamentals of Computer Systems
  • Unit 7 – Fundamentals of Computer Organisation and Architecture
  • Unit 8 – Consequences of Uses of Computing
  • Unit 9 – Fundamentals of Communication and Networking
  • Unit 10 – Fundamentals of Programming
  • Unit 11 – Fundamentals of Data Structures
  • Unit 12 – Fundamentals of Algorithms
  • Unit 13 – Theory of Computation
  • Unit 14 – Fundamentals of Data Representation
  • Unit 15 – Fundamentals of Computer Systems
  • Unit 16 – Fundamentals of Computer Organisation and Architecture
  • Unit 17 – Consequences of Uses of Computing
  • Unit 18 – Fundamentals of Communication and Networking
  • Unit 19 – Fundamentals of Databases
  • Unit 20 – Big Data
  • Unit 21 – Fundamentals of Functional Programming
  • Unit 22 – Systematic Approach to Problem Solving
  • Unit 23 – Non-exam Assessment – The Computing Practical Project

Assessment

After two years of study you take two examinations and complete a non-exam assessment. The first paper is an on-screen exam lasting two hours and 30 minutes and tests your ability to program and your theoretical knowledge of computer science from the subject content in Units 10 to 13 and the skills required from Unit 22. The second paper is a written examinations lasting two hours and 30 minutes and tests your ability to answer questions from the subject content of Units 14 to 21. The non-exam assessment assesses your ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve or investigate a practical problem.

Progression

A Level Computer Science has been designed for students who wish to go on to any higher education course or employment where knowledge of computing would be beneficial. Students who study computer science can go on to a very wide range of careers, including medicine, law, business, politics or any type of science.

Last year, A Level Computer Science students progressed onto a wide range of degree programmes including –

University Degree
University of Cambridge Mathematics
Edinburgh University Artificial Intelligence
Plymouth University Computing

Exam Board

AQA.