Law


The opportunity to study Law prior to university is a rare one. It is impossible to do so in most countries and it is generally offered only in specialist colleges in the UK. CCSS is one of them, and it has been conspicuously successful in enthusing students’ interest and understanding.

Course Overview

Within the first year of the new linear A Level for Law, you will study a variety of topics designed to develop your understanding of the English legal system. The topics themselves divide between a focus on the law-making processes that take place within England, and the study of the many branches that comprise the legal system. Within law-making you will cover the following: how law is made both by Parliament and judges; parliamentary law making; delegated legislation; statutory interpretation and judicial precedent. You will also study the legal system: this covers the civil court system; other forms of dispute resolution; the criminal court system; magistrates and juries; the legal profession and other sources of advice and funding, and the judiciary. There will also be an additional focus on the influence of the European Union on the English legal system.

With this in-depth study of law-making processes and the legal system, attention is focused towards questioning whether the legal system is democratic in nature and whether it is designed to deliver justice.

The first year of A Level Law also provides the opportunity to study more specific aspects of Law such as Criminal Law. The beginning of this unit provides an introduction to principles of criminal liability which operate as fundamental building blocks when establishing criminal liability. These principles are then applied by students (as lawyers do in practice) to many criminal law offences such as non-fatal offences against the person (i.e. assault, battery, actual bodily harm, and grievous bodily harm), along with murder and manslaughter. You will also explore the ways in which defences can be used by lawyers, such as self-defence in order to negate liability. Students are required to apply this knowledge to problem scenarios.

Property offences in criminal law will be studied, where you will be able to establish liability for potential offenders by again referring to the criminal law principles (building blocks of criminal law) and how they apply to theft, robbery, burglary, blackmail, criminal damage and various fraud offences.

Within the second year of A Level Law, you will be introduced to civil law (the law of tort) and study the principles of civil liability in negligence. This will include exploring a multitude of civil cases which demonstrate very important civil law rulings in regards to the owing of a duty of care between plaintiff and claimant, when a breach of a duty of care takes place, which results in foreseeable damage to the claimant.

The second year also provides for the study of contract law and the nature of law. The contract law unit will allow you to be able to identify the various aspects needed with the formation of a contract such as offer, acceptance, and intention to create legal relations. The nature of law unit includes the study of various topics regarding the theory of law such as Law and morality, Law and justice, whether liability does and should depend on fault, and whether the law successfully balances conflicting interests between individuals and the public.

Unit Guide

Within the first year of the AQA Law A Level, you will study the following units:

  • English Legal System
  • Criminal Law
  • Tort Law

Within the second year of the AQA Law A Level, you will study the following units:

  • Tort Law (Continued)
  • Contract Law
  • The Nature of Law (Law and Morality, Law and Justice, Fault, Judicial Creativity, Balancing Conflicting Interests)

Assessment

Law A Level is a linear qualification with all assessment at the end of the course. There are three two-hour examinations, each exam being worth a total of 100 marks, and each amounting to 33% of the overall A level. The three papers are as follows:

Paper 1 provides assessment on the nature of law, the English legal system, and Criminal Law units. The structure of the exam paper includes multiple choice, short answer and long answer, scenario related questions.

Paper 2 provides assessment on the nature of law, the English legal system, and Tort Law units. The structure of the exam paper includes multiple choice, short answer and long answer, scenario related questions.

Paper 3 provides assessment on the nature of law, the English legal system, and Contract Law units. The structure of the exam paper includes multiple choice, short answer and long answer, scenario related questions.

Special Features

The classroom experience is supplemented by visiting speakers and by visits to see law courts in operation. In class, the small groups, typically six students, enable skills of debate and collaboration to develop, both ideal preparation for study at degree level.

Progression

Law is a well-respected area of study at university level, whether or not you intend to follow a career in law. Studying law at any level will teach you valuable skills of analysis, comprehension and linguistic precision which provide an excellent preparation for the world of work. Career paths include the legal profession, media, education, politics, journalism, the civil service, human resources, finance and business.

Last year, A Level Law students progressed onto a wide range of degree programmes including –

University Degree
Pearson College London Business Management with Finance
Westminster University Politics and International Relations

Exam Board

AQA.