Dealing with student stress and anxiety


Stress and anxiety

Mental Health Foundation’s recent Mental Health Awareness Week was a great reminder about the improvements we can make in order to better cope with life’s ups and downs. Your time as a student will occasionally be difficult, but it’s not just starting university that can trigger stress and anxiety. As a college student, you’ll have to juggle exams, revision, money worries, part time work, potential loneliness, and homesickness. All of these are common causes of student stress.

Stress is a natural feeling, so knowing how to cope with stressful experiences and challenging situations is important. Read on to discover our top tips for dealing with student stress and anxiety.

Know the signs of stress

Being able to identify stressful or anxious feelings is a vital part of dealing with college and private school pressures. Without the right management, stress can influence every aspect of our lives. In addition to making an individual extremely irritable, anxious and depressed, one of the first signs of stress is experiencing insomnia. This sleep issue can in turn worsen stress and anxiety further. Verywell Mind explains:

“Because sleep is so important to overall health, insomnia can affect your life in many ways. A sleep deficit can make you feel mentally slower and more emotional, which can exacerbate your experience of stress. Dealing with lasting insomnia can cause stress, too, which can lead to more stress-related insomnia. And, if your insomnia is stress-related to begin with, being overly tired and stressed does nothing to help solve the problems that are creating the stress in the first place.”

Stress can also have a number of physical effects on the body. Stressed individuals may experience dry mouth, churning stomach, heart palpitations, sweating, and shortness of breath. Understand these signs, work out the triggers, and make changes to ease strain for better results when managing stress.

Lead a healthier lifestyle

ExerciseImproving your health and well-being will leave your body and mind in the best possible condition to deal with stressful situations. Eating well, getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly all help to deal with short term and longer periods of stress. Taking time out from your studies to socialise with friends and talk to others will help you deal with student stress and anxiety.

When socialising with others, don’t be afraid to share your feelings and experiences. Chatting to individuals in similar situations, instead of comparing yourself and your achievements, is a great way to ease pressure. Sometimes you can feel like you are the only one feeling this way, but it maybe a surprise to find that other people are feeling similarly. You’ll probably find that your friends are working through some of these challenges themselves too.

Learn to relax

At first glance, relaxing may seem simple but when workloads get heavy and stressful, it can be difficult to switch off. Relaxation and breathing exercises are useful techniques to learn and provide instant relief when stress arises. Focusing on something that you enjoy doing can also boost positivity, whilst quashing the negativity that often goes hand-in-hand with stressful scenarios.

Are you stressed? Take LearnPsychology’s quick quiz, and become one step closer to dealing with student stress and anxiety.

Where to look next:

  • To find out more about our A Level and GCSE courses, click here
  • We have possibly the best boarding in the UK – have a look at boarding at CCSS
  • Our student profiles give you an insight into what life is like for students at CCSS
  • If you’re interested in seeing which universities our students go to, click here.

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